Weaning advice - only for families that have already been seen and tested in clinic by Dr Du Toit

Most pediatric guidelines suggest first introducing single ingredient foods between 4 and 6 months of age, at a rate not faster than one new food every 3 or so days. Trust your gut instinct and when baby appears to be hungry despite adequate milk intake (e.g. waking in night, hunger cries more frequent, following and grasping at foods...) then commence weaning. Typical weaning foods in the Western diet include rice or oat cereals, yellow/orange vegetables such as sweet potato, squash, and carrots, fruits, e.g. apples, pears, and bananas, green vegetables, and then additional foods such as meat and fish. Parents are reminded that it is common for acidic fruits, e.g. berries, tomatoes, citrus fruits, and vegetables to cause, upon contact with the skin, localized, peri-oral reactions that may include an erythematous rash or urticaria due to irritation from the acid in these foods and high levels of histamine releasing compounds within the foods, respectively. These do not usually result in systemic reactions; therefore, delayed introduction of such foods is not recommended. Such foods will be best tolerated when cooked and if a thick emollient is applied to any dry skin or eczema on the checks. 

I do not suggest introducing one of the highly allergenic foods as one of the first weaning foods; however, once a few typical weaning solid foods are tolerated, highly allergenic foods may be introduced as weaning foods (only if the tests were negative to that food). 

The Food Standards Agency has details on other foods to be avoided in the first year for reasons other than allergy concerns; e.g. whole cow’s milk (not appropriate in make up for children's needs, dairy products are fine (if NOT milk allergic), honey (risk of Botulism), certain fish species, under-cooked egg (risk of Salmonella), whole nuts (risk of choking).